Wednesday, March 09, 2005

i'm back

okay, that's the only image of Korean rice cake I could find quickly. It's a book called 2005 Ewha Photo Diary: Tteok - Korean Rice Cake. How beautiful and crazy does it look?

Sorry folks. If anyone did miss me i kinda abandoned this blog because there are so many better food writers out there and i also think it's weird having a blog without pictures. That said, i'm back. I’ve decided to focus a bit more on hunting down fun places to eat and good foods but there should still be plenty of recipes.

This week’s big discovery is Box Hill. Okay, this eastern suburb of melbourne wasn't sitting around waiting to be discovered but it was a bit off my radar. Sarah decided we had to go on a date out there – a mystery date which had me on the Eastern freeway going “where are we going?” over and over like a kid.

Box Hill is like what I wish chinatown was - lots of cheap asian joints ranging from your traditional shanghai dumpling house to asian vegetarian places. And lots of Korean!

We decided to check out a place on Bank St, opposite the railway line. It was called Korean Deli and was oddly scattered with all sorts of schmonces. Weird stuff like little dolls made out corn husks and ceramic clowns. The menu has great photos of the food – macro close ups of omelettes and stuff. We settled on mung bean pancakes, rice cake in spicy sauce (dukboki) and the stone bowl rice.

The pancakes were little pikelet sized morsels and had good crunchy stuff inside. I had the feeling they weren't fried fresh though, which could have helped. The rice cake was just how I like it - big long tubes of rice dumpling, good and chewy and with a sauce that was, as our waiter said “just a little bit hot”. As usual “with vegetables” meant a bit of sliced onion and carrot, but somehow that didn’t matter. The stone bowl was also great – a big hot bowl of rice (so hot the rice is still crackling when it comes out) covered with little mounds of delicately grated vegies, seaweed and pickles. Topped with a fried egg of course. Our waiter was not impressed with my skills at stirring it so he asked if he could do it. Adding lots of sauce he then proceeded to chop up the egg with a spoon and thoroughly mix everything together. "You're heaps better at that" I said. "Yes, I'm Korean" he replied.

A great meal all in all – the only funny thing being that we didn’t automatically get served all my beloved side dishes. I don't think they were used to having honkeys in, and they seemed to think we wouldn't cope with all their weird food. It was only when I asked for some kimchi that they were brought out. The peppery fungus was particularly awesome as were the little potatoes. I don’t know how they make them so soft but still together but I love ‘em.

The whole meal, with roast corn tea came to $25.30. For dessert we went around the corner to the stupidly named crepelato. Of course I had to go for the crepes with peanut butter and condensed milk. Sarah insisted on chocolate gelato on top. Of course they were fantastic – choc-peanut butter is always such a winner of a combination.

And the best thing about the trip? We found a place that does vegetarian yum cha. So you know where I’m heading on my next free morning…

8 comments:

aardvarknav said...

You have to be careful using images that are probably copyrighted. On the political blog side, the LA Times is suing a blogger not because he used a copyrighted article on his site, but because he linked to the article on their web site. I think that is going too far and is probably politically based.

Sandy said...

There's a precedent in US law that linking isn't a copyright violation - but some big corporations send legal threats to try to intimidate people into taking them down. It has no substance.

Anyway I mostly wanted to say I did, indeed, miss you and am happy you're back.

Interad said...

Hi, I really like your blog. There is this outstanding website regarding republic of korea. You better check it out some time.

Interad said...

Hello, I am a korean visitor, good to see you.
I am sure that your blog page looks great to me which mean looking crowded so, I would like to let everybodies know korea information official site korea.net same as Dynamic korea - contains all about korea news and informations, please let me introducel this cool site. Dynamic korea offer korea travel, culture, food, arts and government info exactly what you want to knowkorean restaurant san jose california. You better check it out some time.

Interad said...

Hello, I am a korean visitor, good to see you.
I am sure that your blog page looks great to me which mean looking crowded so, I would like to let everybodies know korea information official site korea.net same as Dynamic korea - contains all about korea news and informations, please let me introducel this cool site. Dynamic korea offer korea travel, culture, food, arts and government info exactly what you want to knowkorean babes. You better check it out some time.

Interad said...

Hello, I am a korean visitor, good to see you.
I am sure that your blog page looks great to me which mean looking crowded so, I would like to let everybodies know Korea information official site korea.net same as Dynamic Korea - contains all about Korea News and informations, please let me introducel this cool site. Dynamic Korea offer korea travel, culture, food, arts and government info exactly what you want to know korean singers. You better check it out some time.

Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net korean kimchi
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.

Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net korean kimchi
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.