Wednesday, April 20, 2005

full as a goog?



I was amused to see a debate at this noticeboard about what "full as a goog" meant and what the hell a goog is anyway. Most people seem to agree with my understanding - that a goog comes from a googy egg (?) and to be "full as a goog" is to be stuffed full of food. It was nice to find out that it can also mean that you are very drunk - full up of grog I guess.

If you want to get full as a goog but can't afford cicciolina you could do worse than a big bowl of noodle soup. This genre is one of my favourites but as usual I'm a bit of a snob - there's nothing worse than a big bowl of creamy orange flavoured soup with a few fat noodles masquerading as a laksa. So two of my favourite Melbourne noodle soup haunts, one old and one new:

the penang coffee house is where I had my first laksa and it served me well for the first 16 years of my life until I fled the Eastern suburbs. The laksa here wins on taste alone, it's a complex spicy broth, more brown than orange. There's also more thin rice noodles than yellow noodles which suits me, a good range of vegies and lots of squishy fried tofu puffs. At $9 or so it's no longer the cheapest option but it is the best. I remember a time when we used to get it take away, and then if there were leftovers I ate them for breakfast... mmmm. I also love that it has pineapple in it, though I know that might gross some people (hi Sarah) out.

Penang Coffee House is at 395 Burwood Road, Hawthorn near the corner of Glenferrie Rd, which is just near Swinburne.

kimchi tray is a new addition to my list. This little korean joint seems to be an offspring of kimchi grandma and offers a smaller range of dishes that come on a tray (ah ha) in more of a quick meal environment. Sadly, you only get 2 side dishes. I dropped in with Mum for an excellent kimchi noodle soup. It was just on the comfortable side of my chilli threshold, full of excellent firm rice noodles, lots of kimchi and some shredded vegies.

Unfortunately one of my side dishes was kimchi, which was a bit redundant while the other one was a couple of slices of orange - made for a good little palate cleanser anyway. The soup was so damn good though that I didn't mind. At about $8 it's going to be my new favourite quick city dinner and it's one that is guaranteed to make you full as a goog.

Kimchi tray is on Flinders st, between Elizabeth and Queen.

10 comments:

Niki said...

Hi - I just stumbled across your blog from Foodporn watch and was amazed to find another Melbourne foodblogger! There's so few of us and it's great to read about restaurants, places and streets that I recognize. I'll be returning!

Sandy said...

I love pineapple in laksa/noodle soup! The first laksa I ever had was a Nyonya and I was very suspicious whitey bogan 'Curried coconut milk? Are you serious?' and it had pineapple in it and it was delicious and now can't believe I went so long without.

Anonymous said...

i secretly like pineapple on pizza too. just because an ingredient may be really really bogan-ish doesn't mean it's not yum!

Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net how to cook korean food
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.

Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net kimchi refrigerator
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.

Dynamic korea said...

Korea.net kimchi refrigerator
Contrary to a cool reception at home in the wake of a recent ruckus of its tarnished image, kimchi is gaining popularity with Americans and other places abroad following a spate of news reports to the effect that the traditional Korean dish has an inherent preventative effect on bird flu, the fear of which is now gripping the world.

It was last March that kimchi's curative effect on avian influenza began to be known well outside of the country, when the British public broadcaster BBC aired the results of a research team led by Seoul National University professor Kang Sa-wook.

Quoting the team's test results, BBC said of the 13 chickens stricken with the influenza, 11 had shown telling curative effects after being administered kimchi extracts.

Back in 2003, when the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) broke out in Asia, there was a ‘kimchi rage' in China and Southeast Asia on the strength of reports that the Korea-originated pickle was working in heading off the epidemic.

In recent weeks, the American media were into handling kimchi's efficacy in treating avian flu.

The ABC network, South Carolina's largest state newspaper, the Murtle Beach Sun News, Centre Daily Times of Pennsylvania, and some 100 media outlets across the United States reported kimchi's curative effects on the epidemic.

The ABC reported on Tuesday that with the interest in kimchi growing in America, sauerkraut, the U.S. version of kimchi, is also enjoying a boom. Sauerkraut, a pickle of German origin made from shredded cabbage fermented in brine, is normally inserted into hot dogs or sandwiches.

Journal Times, a publication from Racine, Wisconsin, reported scientists speculated that the bacteria which were detected in kimchi, help cure avian influenza, adding that the same strains were also discovered in sauerkraut.

Kim Jae-soo, the agricultural attaché to the Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., said that contrary to the perception of misgivings Koreans have at home, the American press has given an intense coverage of kimchi's curative effects on the poultry epidemic.
He noted that although the U.S. media had not paid significant attention to kimchi when it gained popularity as a curative to SARS in Southeast Asia, it is watching carefully this time around.

Meanwhile, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Korea Agro-Trade Corp. on Thursday (Nov. 10), despite the recent unsavory episode involving tainted kimchi, Korea's exports of the item amounted to 26,275 tons in the first 10 months of the year, up 81 tons from a year earlier.

In particular, shipments to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have surged partly due to Hallyu, or the Korean cultural wave, prompted by Daejanggeum, a Korean TV drama aired in those countries. In the January-October period, exports to Taiwan totaled 561 tons, up 72 percent from a year before. Hong Kong and Malaysia saw their imports increase by 15 and 150 percent respectively.

Besides, prospects for suspended kimchi shipments to Japan to resume were bright as the Japanese authorities were about to end their investigation into the Korean products soon. About 93 percent of Korea's total exports of 34,827 tons last year went to Japan.

SexyLeeAnn said...

Hi!

I am just wondering if the Penang Laksa is the authentic version... with just gravy and thick white noodles... and pineapples.. mint leaves...

that's all. i saw the pic u posted.. and am wondering if it is the original Penang Laksa...

i really want to taste Penang Laksa.... but in melbourne.. it's like finding a needle in a haystack.

pls email me if u or anyone else know where to get Penang Laksa in Melbourne!

sexyleeann@sexyleeann.com

esther said...

Hi Lee Ann,
as far as I know the Penang Coffee Shop seems like a pretty real deal kind of place.. but i can't vouch for authenticity. It certainly does have pineapple and thick noodles.. but i think they're yellow and then it has thin noodles as well. Definitely a good thick grainy gravy. Why not give it a try and let me know how authentic you think it is.

Anonymous said...

From Google (ahaha):

"Goog" is a variation of the northern English slang word "googie" meaning an egg.

Heh... words are awesome.

Anonymous said...

the term was actually 'full as a gook' and it stems from the Vietnam War when US soliders would riddle their enemy with bullets and joke about it. in Aussie slang it has lost this connotation obviously, but I still find it kinda disturbing.